for lawyer Richard Malka, the solution is to “talk to them about freedom”

In recent months, attacks on secularism have continued to increase in schools, with 313 reports in September, in particular for the “wearing of religious signs and outfits”, such as the veil. Added to this are the threats against teachers, especially after classes related to the question of secularism, which continue to cause concern, two years after the assassination of Samuel Paty. If the question of young people and religion continues to be debated, Richard Malka, lawyer for Charlie Hebdo and author of The right to piss off Godreturned to the subject this Friday at the microphone of Dimitri Pavlenko on Europe 1.

“A fanatic is someone who cannot count beyond one”

According to him, “talking about freedom to young people” would be a way of distancing them from religious ideology. “Talking to young people is not complicated, and when you do it, you have to leave out the conceptual words but when you talk to young people about freedom, there is always a little light that goes on in their eyes. At that age, they have not yet lost the taste for freedom, they do not have the attraction for the chains and the bars that one can have later, when the spirit is totally fanatic. he explains.

For the Charlie Hebdo lawyer, unlike freedom which would be “an uncomfortable abyss”, fanaticism is “comforting, there is no risk, we tell you what to do, how to dress, what eat…” Before adding: “As the writer Delphine Horvilleur said, who came to testify at the Charlie Hebdo trial, a fanatic is someone who can’t count beyond one, it’s very pleasant not to know how to do it, we have the revelation, we don’t ask ourselves any questions”, he concludes.

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